Our Blog

Getting set for Thursday.

While we’re getting ready for Thanksgiving dinner with friends and family, we’d like to take a moment to thank a few important people in our lives. Thanks to our staff, who deliver quality and service every day. Thanks to our community, without your support we’d be nothing. Thanks to our families, for understanding that running a business is a 24/7 commitment. And thanks to you, our customer and friend. We’re all lucky, blessed and need to share our gratitude every day. (We’ll be closed tomorrow, see you Friday.)

Corduroy classic.

Autumn favorite, corduroy needs special cleaning care to preserve the rich velvety pile and prevent shrinking. If your corduroy garment is washable, check the label before throwing it in the wash. Never wash with lint producers like fleece, felt or terry. Use the right water temperature, wash like colors together and turn the garment inside out. Then air dry until barely damp, tumble dry for ten minutes at lowest temperature to fluff the nap. Pull from dryer and shake out, turn back right side out and brush nap to remove any lint or surface wrinkles. Or skip all that and let us clean your corduroy for like-new results.

Dress the table.

Our linen specialists put the finishing touches on your tablecloth and napkins. Nothing’s as nice as professional pressing – and our experts can remove most stains, even on delicate lace and heirloom linens. Bring your holiday linens in now and they’ll be clean and crisp for your Thanksgiving festivities.

Cuff notes.

We see all styles of dress shirt cuffs, sometimes the French cuff, most usually the square or mitered barrel cuff. They both add a structured design, with straight, hard-line geometry. The rounded cuff, on the other hand, is soft on the eye, and doesn’t minimize the clean lines that your shirt may already have. It’s finished and deliberate, but doesn’t take your casual denim shirt or rumpled linen to a stuffy or unnatural place. You’re going to see rounded cuffs everywhere – not because they’re necessarily better, but because they walk the middle of the road in an entirely inoffensive way.

Pet hair management.

Consumer Reports cautions that pet hair can clog a washing machine, preventing proper drainage, clumping in drains or sticking to the side of the machine. They recommend you remove the hair from clothes with a lint roller or masking tape. For bedding, put on a rubber glove, dampen it with water, and run your hand over the sheet or blanket. The hair will cling to the glove, so you’ll need to wash it off from time to time. Then run everything through a ten-minute no-heat dryer cycle – most of the hair will be in the lint trap. Throw into the washer, adding 1/2-cup white vinegar to the rinse cycle. Clean the washer by running an empty cycle, then wipe down the tub with a damp cloth.